Youth Ensembles

National Youth Orchestra of China

© Chris Lee

Introduction

The National Youth Orchestra of China (NYO-China) brings together one hundred of China’s finest young musicians for a month-long summer festival and international concert tour. Students are selected through a competitive and meritocratic audition process open to all Chinese citizens aged 14 to 21 years old. The best, who represent leading conservatories from all across China and abroad, gather for an intensive training residency with faculty drawn from the principal players of top-tier orchestras. Then, these students are given the opportunity to perform in premier international venues alongside a world-renowned conductor and soloist. In doing so, China’s most promising young musicians are able to serve as ambassadors for both their country and their generation on a global stage.

Inspired by Carnegie Hall’s own National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America (NYO-USA), NYO-China provides Chinese musicians access to the same exceptional education and performance model developed by its American counterpart. The entire program is provided at no costs to students. All expenses, including tuition, travel, and housing, are covered to ensure that no talented musician is ever turned away for lack of funds.

NYO-China was founded in 2017 and that summer, the musicians gathered in the USA for the training residency before debuting in a sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall and embarking on a three-city tour of China.

Askonas Holt is delighted to have worked with NYO-China on their inaugural tour in 2017 and on their European tour in 2019.


Introduction

The National Youth Orchestra of China (NYO-China) brings together one hundred of China’s finest young musicians for a month-long summer festival and international concert tour. Students are selected through a competitive and meritocratic audition process open to all Chinese citizens aged 14 to 21 years old. The best, who represent leading conservatories from all across China and abroad, gather for an intensive training residency with faculty drawn from the principal players of top-tier orchestras. Then, these students are given the opportunity to perform in premier international venues alongside a world-renowned conductor and soloist. In doing so, China’s most promising young musicians are able to serve as ambassadors for both their country and their generation on a global stage.

Inspired by Carnegie Hall’s own National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America (NYO-USA), NYO-China provides Chinese musicians access to the same exceptional education and performance model developed by its American counterpart. The entire program is provided at no costs to students. All expenses, including tuition, travel, and housing, are covered to ensure that no talented musician is ever turned away for lack of funds.

NYO-China was founded in 2017 and that summer, the musicians gathered in the USA for the training residency before debuting in a sold-out concert at Carnegie Hall and embarking on a three-city tour of China.

Askonas Holt is delighted to have worked with NYO-China on their inaugural tour in 2017 and on their European tour in 2019.

Press

 
  • More info  
    18 Jul 17 JAMES R. OESTREICH In These Orchestras, Youth Meets Musical Beauty
    Carnegie Hall

    After a stop-and-go drive from New York City to East Stroudsburg, Pa., some 75 miles northwest, on a sleepy morning last week, I wasn’t necessarily expecting magic. But a small bit happened in a nondescript classroom at East Stroudsburg University, during a sectional rehearsal of the four oboists of the newly formed National Youth Orchestra of China.

    Led by Liang Wang, the principal oboist of the New York Philharmonic, three players worked through the first movement of Dvorak’s “New World” Symphony, which the orchestra – 105 musicians, ages 14 to 21 – will perform in its debut concert on Saturday evening at Carnegie Hall. The fourth player, Ming Liu, sat silently, holding an English horn, a larger, lower-range relative of the oboe, with a rounded bell.

    Then came the second-movement Largo, with its vaunted English horn solo, the tune that William Arms Fisher turned into the song “Goin’ Home,” often mistaken for a pre-existing spiritual. Ms. Liu, 19, an utterly disarming presence in her Snoopy T-shirt, played the melody as beautifully and soulfully as I have ever heard it.

    Ms Liu, who is enrolled at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, works regularly with Mr Wang. He urged her on here to greater expressivity, and even he seemed enthralled by the results.

    Read the full article here.